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Flange Designations
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Posted by: lumpidydumpy

10/22/2007, 14:50:04

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What does the # rating mean in flange sizes? i.e. what does a 600# flange mean? I know the sizes, but what does the pressure class(lb.) mean?







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Re: Flange Designations
: Flange Designations -- lumpidydumpy Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Jop

10/22/2007, 16:41:26

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Look at this site. It is a Pressure/temperature chart for Flange ratings. I think you will "get-it"

http://www.scsenergy.com/scsdataflgrating.htm








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Posted by: lumpidydumpy

10/25/2007, 16:39:58

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Yeah I already have that Chart Posted In my Cube, but I dont understand what the lb. designation is. I dont get why they call a 600 lb. flange 600 lb.







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Posted by: JVan

10/25/2007, 19:23:14

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If you go back far enough in history ( the following information is derived from " Marks Handbook, 4th edition, 1941)

There were 3 classes of cast iron flanges rated as "American Standard"; 25 Lb, 125Lb and 250Lb.
They were listed as.
American Standard Cast-iron Pipe Flanges and Flanged Fittings
For Maximum Working Steam Pressure of 25Lb., 125 Lb, and 250Lb per Sq.In. (Gage)


. These ratings roughly corresponded to the nominal ratings of the iron pipe available at the time; Standard Pipe, Extra Strong Pipe and Double Extra Strong.

These eventually evolved into the Schedule10, 40, 80, and 160 pipes that we have today.
The Flanges have evolved into the ANSI flanges of today, but the labeling stayed similar.

At the time the engineer had to really design his system because the terms Standard pipe, Extra Strong Pipe etc. were dimensional standards, the pressure rating of the pipe was based on material and manufacturing. For instance Grade B seamless had a higher pressure rating than "Grade B Electric fusion welded steel per ASTMA155" but Grade B Electric fusion welded steel had almost the same pressure rating as "Lap-welded steel per ASTM A106. Marks lists 27 types of fabricated pipe from Seamless steel to Cast Iron and differentiates the cast iron as centrifugally cast or pit cast.

An interesting side note, the size ranges included in the standard at the time..
25 Lb. Flanges. 4" to 96 " pipe size

125Lb. Flanges... 1" to 12" pipe then 14" O.D. to 96" O.D., the 96" used (68) 2 " bolts on a 108 " bolt circle. Oil Field stuff.

Hope this helps,
John








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